How I Master Tracks using Ozone 9 Advanced: Part 1 - Reference Tracks - Red Means Recording
Mastering Ozone

How I Master Tracks using Ozone 9 Advanced: Part 1 - Reference Tracks - Red Means Recording

Matthew Vere
Matthew Vere

Ozone standalone allows you to load in multiple tracks to master (if working on an album) or for reference material.

Always use gain matching in Ozone and use the gain-matched bypass when A/B'ing your material.

The Loudness & EQ option = Intensity, which sets the loudness.

The streaming option sets the output to -1dB.

MV: From https://www.vere.audio/are-you-listening-s2-ep-4/

"A natural side effect of converting a lossless format (WAV) to a lossy codec (MP3) is an increase in the peak level. There is a 0.5dB difference in the example given when a WAV is converted to a 192 Kbps MP3 file. It would be best to prepare your masters for this when they go out to streaming services by setting the peak to -1dB. The -1dB ceiling helps reduce distortion and intersample peaks when the file is converted."

The CD options will set the output to -0.3dB (for intersample peaks).

Always use LUFS - Integrated loudness over time-weighted to how our ears perceive frequencies.

True peak limiting kills intersample peaks.

You can load reference tracks into Ozone, in the bottom right corner (MV: I didn't realise this).

Save Match EQ presets for later use (from your reference tracks).

Check the stereo image of your reference tracks:
Load the reference into Ozone and divide it into three bands. Repeat this process for your project. Then listen to each band from the reference and compare them to yours. This should inform any frequency content you need to add or remove and any changes to the track's stereo image.